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. bush was not totally forthcoming withhe american people. lyndon johnson was not forthcoming about the gulf of tonkin incident, and james polk was not forthcoming. he maneuvered the country into war without telling america that his undlying aim was territorial expansion. when that became clear, it sapped his political standing significantly. >> was the unpopular when he left office? >> he was a president with a great deal of iron will and a great deal of determination to get what he wanted. he was willing to expend a great deal of political capital. as a result, i think he sacked his political stamina. >> in perusing your book, because it is a substantial volume -- in preparing for today, i was struck by the fact that he was not confrontational. he was not mendon johnson -- lyndon johnson. he endured buchanan, his secretary of state is terrible antics, and yet you say he was an iron will demand. these are not tolerances of iron-willed men, are they? >> he was a paradoxical. when it came to face-to-face confrontation, he was -- there is no better word for it -- a coward. he could no
prizes along with numerous others awards. author of the amazing three volume biography of lyndon johnson. peggy noonan ronald reagan's chief speechwriter. then a terrific book about those years. "what i saw at the revolution." mel painter, a priceton university historian and author of "creating black americans: history of african-americans over the last 400 years." that was white a mouthful. peggy, when you were in the white house with ronald reagan, at the end of the first year i think people would have talked about optimism, confidence, things like that. what do you think people will say with this first year? >> i think this first year of obama, i think history will probably look back on it as an attempt to change the face of america in the world, which so far appears to be a good beginning, coupled with, i think, a serious domestic misstep with regard to focusing on certain issues that were not the great issues the american people were focused on when the great recession really sunk in. >> internationally, if i read your comment right, you've been quite supportive of his change of ton
biography of "lyndon johnson." peggy noonan. a terrific about the years. "what i saw at the revolution." nell painter is a princeton university historian and author of "creating black americans, a history of african-americans over the last 400 years." welcome. that was quite a mouthful. peggy, when you were in the white house with ronald reagan, the end of the first year, i think people would have talked about optimism, confidence, and things like that. what do you think people will say with this first year? >> i think this first year of obama, i think history will probably look back on it as an attempt to change the face of america in the world which so far appears to be a good beginning. coupled with, i think, a serious domestic misstep with regard to focusing on certain issues that were not the great issues the american people were focused on when the great recession really sung in. >> internationally, ifyou have been quite supportive. >> yeah. i think it was needed. i think bringing a new face -- literally and figuratively, to american -- of american foreign policy to the world, wa
-time pulitzer prize winner and author of biographies on lyndon johnson. peggy noonan, "wall street journal" columnist and writer who authored many of ronald reagan's greatest speeches. not to mention five bestselling books. wallster isaacson, one-time chairman and ceo of this network, cnn and the author of great biographies. among them benjamin franklin and henry kissinger. "new york times" editor and author of a new book "the death of conservatism." welcome to all of you. let me first begin with the poll numbers. one year into his presidency, what i'm struck on, i was looking at this historical polls and he's roughly where reagan was and a little bit ahead actually of clinton. behind both bushes. 41 because of the collapse of the soviet union and 43 because of 9/11. they are all lower than eisenhower and kennedy. who were in the high 60s and low 70s. is that about watergate? is that about the media? is that about a different partisan climate? or were eisenhower and kennedy an exceptional bipartisan moment in american history? >> i do think that poisonous partisan atmosphere, media environ
carroll, the two-time pulitzer prize winner and biographies on lyndon johnson. peggy newnan "wall street journal" columnist who wrote ronald reagan's speeches and five best-selling books. and the author of some great biographies. among them about benjamin franklin and henry kissinger and sam tanenhaus author of a terrific new book "the death of conservatism." still surprisingly relevant. welcome to all of you. let me first begin with the poll numbers. one year into his presidency. i was looking at historical polls and he's roughly where reagan was, a little bit ahead of, actually, of clinton and behind both bushes 41 because of the collapse of the soviet union and 43 because of 9/11. i was struck by something else that i want to ask you guys about. they're all lower than eisenhower and kennedy who were in the high 60s, low 70s. is that about watergate and is that about the media and a different partisan climate or were eisenhower and kennedy kind of exceptional bipartisan moment in american history? >> i do think the poisonous atmosphere and everything helps to tear down a person's ratin
't like the idea of lyndon johnson signing a bill and saying we shall overcome. they feel like, lyndon johnson has taken our message. and we want more than just the right to vote. we want candidates who are better than johnson to vote for. and on the other side, the people who are against the reform, who i call theiéqz countermovement, or a machiavellian, the people who try to tinker with the status quo, they areh)7w not thrilled h the reform either. because they resisted it for so long. so they wage a kind of rearguard action. they accept the reform on paper, but they try to haul it out, defunded, make it as ineffectual as possible. and in the middle there3qc are people who were fence sitters in the '60s. they are not in the movement, not in the countermovement, but they have risen pragmatically to positions of power, professors, pundits, media people, politicians. and they tend to want to claim the reform that they had nothing to do with achieving. it may be in the form of making a postage stamp out of malcolm x, or naming a street after sesser chavez, or including a book by noam ch
'm sort of in the middle of it now. it's, you know, lyndon johnson, president, civil rights, vietnam, turning points in american history, so it's an interesting book to do. interesting for me to try to do it. >> when do you foresee it being finished? >> i think i have about two more years' work on this. >> how many years of your professional life have been devoted to lyndon johnson? >> well, i started -- i have to date it back. the power broker came out in -- that was my first book by robert moses -- came out in '74, and i started in '76 on lyndon johnson. do i want to add this up? it's 33 years. [laughter] >> what first sparked you, your interest in lbj? >> oh, good question. you know, i never look at my books as biographies. i never want to do a book just about a great man. but i'm interested in this political power and how it works and using a man's life to show it. so with rob
, and going at least through every presidential library through lyndon johnson, he said i think you'd find a lot of stuff in presidential papers that has not been redacted by your former employer, the central intelligence agency. so i said, hey, that's a great idea. and that's exactly what i did. you know, i went to austin, texas, and hyde park, and in some places i can't and in other places i stayed in a hostel, sleeping in a room with four to six other guys. because i like to eat well, you see. that's what i did. so that was the second serendipitous. then the third one, occurred one day as i was walking out of the navy department library at the end of the day's research. a gentleman coming out of an adjoining building notice i was walking towards the bus stop, and he said, where are you going? i told him that and he offered me a ride. he turned out to be a native historian who had published a work on naval operations during the cuban missile crisis that had a few pertinent pages on guantanamo. files were in the unsecure area where he worked. that is now my book that he would not be there
the ability to award and to punish. >> lyndon johnson. >> he comes to mind, but so did others. chuck, what did you think? >> i have never seen the democrats as confused as they are right now. they still do not know the way forward, but there is a deadline for this to be revealed. it is next wednesday night at the state of the union, when president obama will almost certainly have to say what the future looks to him and the rest of the administration and the democratic establishment. >> lauren, do you think conservatives are growing too early? they have one big victory, two small ones, in massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. >> we all know that republicans and democrats ebb and flow with power, and when you are disgusted with one party, the independents move to the left or the right. i think if they do start to crow too early, they could have a problem in the 2010 elections later this year. many democrats, i think, are very nervous, will not sign on to any sort of health care proposal for fear that it is political suicide in the fall. and i think that the republicans need to do what you sai
of 64, and the immigration act of 65. they all happened under lyndon johnson and they fundamentally transform who is america, who can vote, who can participate in the american creation of a society in a political system. so what i decided to do what it together this timeline of events from 1965 to the present that are important from an arab-american perspective. some of those events are important to all americans like 9/11. then other things, since the american memory is much shorter than the arab memory there are some events like the 73 energy crisis more than 91 goals or, sort of pass from american memory. and then other events like what happens to alex in california in 1985 are completely unknown to anybody outside of arab-american or out of aggressive circles and yet had quite an impact on the humidity all across the country. so once i decide to assemble a time when i went about and cast each of those chapters with a different arab-american to sort of live those moments of time in their skin. you're going to get a feeling for the book as i go forward. when i get a chance to read
at the beginning of this chapter three, and at our back is lyndon johnson. it looks like the dining room on the first floor of the white house. you've got on the left there lew wasserman, arthur krim, bob benjamin, lots of other names, and at the very far end, tom johnson, who was the deputy press secretary at the time. why this picture? and why lyndon johnson? >> guest: oh, well, that picture -- i love that picture because wasserman was really crazy about lbj, and definitely was closer to him than to any other president. and wasserman is right there at his left. and wasserman always said that johnson had offered him the position of secretary of commerce. ultimately, i came to believe that that was not true that he had actually offered it to him. i think there was some suggestion about it, but i don't believe that it was ever offered. but that became part of wasserman's -- it was very important to wasserman, first of all, to have this political influence as a reality, and also to be able to sort of trade on it. i mean, it -- it enhanced his aura, the fact that he was friends with pr
in the political arena. i was reminded of the story of lyndon johnson when he was vice president. was told about president kennedy's appointments of all these brilliant people. he said, you know, i wish one of them had run for county sheriff. we are going to see now an inundags of special interest money to political campaigns. i think that diminishes the influence of average citizens. by the way, i would point out that both justice rehnquist and justice o'connor who had taken a different position on this issue both had significant political experience. justices roberts, alito and scalia have none. but it what it is. >> schieffer: so you will... you're not intending to try to introduce any legislation. you just don't think.... >> the supreme court has spoken on an issue of constitution... on a constitutional basis. >> schieffer: but reform is dead? >> oh, i think so. you know, i think that there's going to be over time a back lash because when you see the amounts of union and corporate money that's going to go into political campaigns, but in the short term the supreme court has spoken. i respect
that they have to change. if you add up the things that he wants to change, he is harkening back to lyndon johnson. it is like he would like to remake america. the reality is that very few presidents get a chance to do that. no matter how much he manufactures, his desire to be there, he is simply not in that place in history. he is more at a crisis point. the u.s. economy is crumbling. it is actually shrinking. the labor force is shrinking. the amount of people looking is shrinking. america is in very serious trouble. this guy has got to get serious about american economy and its place in the world. he keeps talking about 3 carving the time, redistributing the pie as it is crumbling is -- in his hands. he has a great opportunity because the republicans don't have much to say about making things better. it is like pulling a light string and getting the light to come on. if you talk to the republicans, they say deregulation. look at wall street, they need regulation. >> we are waiting for the president who will be departing the white house in about seven or 8 minutes. meanwhile, the senate h
the legislation's and they all happened under lyndon johnson and fundamentally transform who is american, who can vote, who can participate in the american's creation of a society and political system and so when i decided to do is put together an alternate tie line of defense from 65 to the present that are important from an arab american perspective so of course these are important to all americans like 9/11 and other things since the american memory is much shorter than for example the air of memory. those defense the 73 energy crisis or the 91 gulf war passed from american memory as a significant moments and then other defense like what happens in california 1985 are completely unknown to anybody outside arab america or progress of circles and had quite an impact on the community all across the country so once i started to decide to assemble the time when i went out and cast each of those chapters with a different arab-american to sort of live those moments of time in their skin and they generously share themselves and to sort of get a feeling for the book has the go forward and when i get a
-terrorism policy has extended the bush policies. in domestic policy, he has done in one year, what it took lyndon johnson to do in two years. that's revitalize the republican party. >> tucker, i feel like i'm going to the russian judge in the olympics. >> i gave him a "d." and that's because he answered oprah's question. any seasoned politician would say, far be it to grade myself. i thought there was a level of political ineptitude. i don't agree with his policies. from day one, from the first piece of legislation, the stimulus, he has shown less cleverness than his campaign showed in 2008. letting the congress write that legislation was a rookie mistake. leaving aside my policy differences, that has been stunning. i think the level of cynicism, totally unexpected. the carve out that unions got, on so-called cadillac plans, so over the top. i wouldn't have expected that from bill clinton, actually. i gave a "d." and i'm stunned. >> later today, president obama will go to massachusetts, where he will put some of his political capital on the lines to campaign for the democratic senator there, mart
decision all the way to the signing of the voting rights act by lyndon johnson. and in between what we're told both as students and as a nation in terms of the popular imagination is that there's all kinds of sit-ins and marchs and demonstrations that occur, but they're really done by these famous iconic people. basically, it's rosa parks who just was so tired that she refused to get up from the bus in montgomery, alabama, and sparked the busboy cot, and basically a young preacher who even the president referred to during the election as this young preacher from georgia which is dr. martin luther king jr. who sort of leads the masses of african-americans from racial oppression. so this notion that rosa sat and, you know, martin could do this stuff and jesse could run and then barack could fly, all these things, they sound good, but they really, they really simplify a much more complicated history. and that complicated history really involves so many african-americans, women and men, who proactively dismantled racial segregation including rosa parks. rosa parks was an activist. she didn
, lyndon johnson or barack obama? we'll be back in a minute.  >>> the first year of the obama administration is now history. so it's time for our report card. now from people who have been watching the obama white house carefully over the past 12 months. we have a panel to talk about it. greg cain from the washington examiner. good morning. >> good morning. >> cynthia gordy is a washington correspondence for essence magazine. good morning. >> good morning. >> and i sit next to larry king from the board of directors of the national you are bon fellows. good morning to all of you. >> good morning. >> we want t take a snapshot now specifically with regard to the african-american community. because history was made. the question is now a year in, are the members of the african- american community specifically disillusions, hardened. what do you think is the pulse of the community when it comes to the african-american community? >> well i believe my sense of the african-american community is still very much supportive of barack obama and i think what barack provides is the leadersh
was re ed in the midterm elects in 1914. fdr when he tried pack the supreme court. lyndon johnson ended we he got too involved in vietnam. ronald reagan it ended when he suffered reversals in the '82 election. now barack obama that period of one year which obama could pass anything he wanted ended on tuesday. it was unique period in american history. it has only been basically one of five periods since 1900, where a president had that kind of power. now i think he's more like a -- traditional president who has to horse trade and negotiate. but he set up an environment and atmosphere where he can't. he's so antagonized and polarized this country and alienated the republicans and the moderates and the independents, i don't think anybody will talk to him. bill: biljana plavsic wait, hold it. he didn't do it. he hasn't been throwing the bombs he let others do it. pelosi, reid, disgraceful pundits who prop up the obama administration every night in the newspapers and on television. but he himself still scores 50% or higher on personal popularity in every poll. i don't think americans dislike
johnson with the great society in -- since lyndon johnson with the great society in 1965. never before have you seen a machine in the white house. willingness to bribe senators, fundamental dishonesty of the system. number one item on drudge today was eight different videos of candidate obama, pledging to have c-span in the room for negotiations. eight different times. people look at that level of dishonesty. it tells-í%y new is a ruthless machine that doesn't care what it says. it cares what it can get away with. >> sean: we are going to show our video in the nextment so great minds think alike. i only found four. eight of 'em, it's entertaining if it weren't so serious. for the president to, you know, break that promise, it seeps like he risks all his credibility. because it seems meaningless, his words, ring hollow! >> well health transformation just posting a youtube video to launch a letter we are asking people to come and help transformation.net to ask the president to keep his word and allow brian lamb and c-span to cover the negotiation as they've offered to. second, what i'm
if they manage to hold on to the seat. one is reminded of lyndon johnson facing a challenge from mccarthy in the new hampshire democratic primary 46 years ago. johnson won but the race was close enough he saw the writing on the wall and dropped out of the race for re-election. 20 years later, walter mondale was beaten by gary heart in new hampshire and quickly recast his campaign and won. bill clin chin got a similar message in the 1994 mid-terms and changed course. he was re-elected. the politicians recognized what they were doing was not working and would lead to defeat so they changed course. the question is mr whether obama will do the same. so far the answer seems to be no. bret? >> bret: so, brit, if martha coakley squeaks this out tonight, do you think healthcare reform can pass? >> better shape than if it's in the senate for the 60 votes. would lack if brown won. but you have to believe that the democrat members of the the house, seeing the earthqua squeaker may have second thoughts about voting for it. it could be in trouble any way it turns out. >> okay, brit. thanks. >> y
about the lyndon johnson administration. so what is that word doing on u.s. government forms now? u.s. government forms now, that every american is going to see this year? how the census bureau went all mayberry rfd. it's coming up. but i was like, this actually works. (announcer) only rogaine foam is shown to regrow hair in 85% of guys. i'll check it out and i'm like, nice. (announcer) rogain foam. stop losing. start gaining. you may save a little money on your arthritis pain relief. but you could end up taking twice as many pills... compared to aleve. choose aleve, it just makes sense. just two aleve have the strength to relieve arthritis pain all day. are more than words here. it's personal. i have diabetes. rodney's kid too. so we're so proud to manufacture... the accu-chek aviva meters and test strips... here in the u.s.a. plus, we've proven you'll waste 50% fewer strips... when you use our meter, which means greater savings... for people with diabetes, like me. now that's a true american value. accu-chek aviva. born in the u.s.a. >>> still ahead, the census and the "n" word, n
. lyndon johnson, what happened here? he would have been right on top of it immediately. >> here's the problem. can a president who's nationally dispassionate -- i've been accused of saying he's ray milland, because he's so calm, never gets ruffled, never sweats like pat and i do, never shows the passion of leadership. can he lead without passion? >> no, you can't lead without passion. the reality is you can't be motivated without passion. passion is what gets us to move. and if he can't get that passion, if he can't get worked up, he's not going to be able to lead and he's not going to be able to motivate. >> he's not going to change. people don't change though, drew. women who want their husbands to change, husbands who want their wives -- i always say to people, have you ever met anybody, drew, who's changed? that's my question. >> passion is a reflection of conviction and belief. you got passion because you really care about it. you can't keep faking it. >> ronald reagan did not lose his temper often, but people knew where he stood. >> he was passionate. >> what's the differe
, the voters aren't going to necessarily give you credit. so the fact that he's outshown lyndon johnson has a legislative master is not winning him any points with voters. >> yeah. mark, i want to ask you, at the time of the president's election and inauguration, some said america had ushered in a new post-racial society. what has changed and what hasn't? >> i haven't seen that post-racial society. you'll have to direct me toward it. i think what we've seen is a greater reluctance to talk about race, a greater reluctance to deal with race. we saw that with harry reid. we saw that with henry louis gates. having a black president in some ways becomes a disadvantage because he understands, he has an acute political mind and understands that every time he gets into the muck and mire of race he becomes a racialized candidate and people tend to move away from him. so we've actually had in some ways to me a diminished conversation about race. in terms of the reality of racism, white supremacy, black people not having access to social resources and goods, those are things that need even more direct
, lyndon johnson. really, the analogy should have been along with franklin roosevelt. if we were facing another crisis on the magnitude of a possible great depression, then he should have been thinking what did fdr do? here is what fdr did and what what obama hasn't done and why he is in such terrible trouble. fdr convincingly made decisions that helped the average person. and that became clear to the public even when unemploymentdrant matcally go down, they still rallied around him because they knew he was trying to help them. that is not the case with president obama. he's seemed to be distracted by the foreign crises or by large liberal reform agendas but not helping ordinary people. and if he -- if you can't make that case, his numbers are going to continue to slide. and it is very difficult at this point for him to make that case. this was the case to be made all year long when he was riding high in the poll. now that he is down around 50% or under by some polls, it is very, very difficult to recover from that. >> okay. >> unemployment is going to remain high. i don't see where he
president. lyndon johnson, to some extent in vietnam, although that caused trouble for him. so obama is going to be able to do, she thinks, recalibrate the conversation in such a way that makes him look stronger on foreign policy. >> sarah kershaw had a piece on psychology of terror and terror cells, given the not guilty plea we heard from the christmas day bombing suspect, what does she explore in that story? >> you know, john, this is a breaking area in research that we don't think about. we're so used to just looking at the terrorists as our adversaries and enemies, which they are, that we forget they are psychologists, experts, who are actually trying to figure out how terror cells operate, how people get pulled into that world, what the sort of mental atmosphere is. that, then, becomes a tool for undoing it. so sarah is going to report on some of the breakthroughs that have been made there. very interesting story. >> and that's it for this hour of the "new york times special edition." sam tannenhouse, thanks for joining us. >> take care. david shuster and alex witt will pick thi
. what is his civil rights record? lyndon johnson used the "n" word constantly. had a phenomenal civil rights record. richard nixon used bad terms regarding jewish folks. he sent everything he could to save israel. presidents don't bother me in the least but i think the big things are what counts. >> i agree with you there, you got to look at the record. is it a surprise to any african-american or any jew or anybody that maybe people sometimes say -- >> you know what? i'm with clinton on this. i think everything in his vocabulary, everything since goat into adult life has been to fight the tradition of his part of the country. >> i don't think that's inconsistent. >> let's talk more about this race in massachusetts which we're talking about the kennedys here, i think. teddy kennedy's seat could easily go republican according to the latest numbers. it was teddy's seat and jack's seat going "r." right back on msnbc. butternut , butternut , blended with delicate herbs. v8 golden butternut squash. from campbell's. a soup so velvety and delicious you won't be able to contain yourself. campb
lyndon johnson did, and he's going to have to now call them out and play offense. >> bob herbert had an excellent article today in the "new york times" -- >> and score! >> and score. -- credibility gap. does the president have a credibility gap with his base right now? >> yes. >> he campaigned on one thing and he's kind of been doing -- so i think tomorrow night has to be the sea change for president obama. >> he's got a credibility gap with almost everybody. i mean that's the source -- >> well, not me. i like the guy. >> okay, other than you, ed. but with most people on the left and the right, and frankly these independents that he's going after. i think the reason that president obama is giving the illusion of trying to do a freeze -- frankly it is an illusion, as i understand the details of it -- but he's trying to win over the independent voters that are rightfully concerned about the run-away spending in washington. >> joe, basically herbert's column was, buddy, you got to define yourself here. let us know who you are. >> that's what i mean by offense. and that's exactly what i'
called up and said find out, he would have be bebeen -- he would have been all over it. lyndon johnson, what happened here. but to be out there snorkeling -- >> can a president, i've been accused of being yesterday saying he's ray milan because he's so calm, he never gets ruffled, never sweats like pat and i do, never shows the passion of leadership. can he lead without passion? >> no, you can't lead without passion. the reality is you can't be motivated without passion. passion is what gets us to move. and if he can't get that passion, if he can't get worked up, he won't be able to lead and motivate. >> all my life i keep asking people, women who want their husbands to change, husbands who want their wives -- i always say, have you ever met anybody who's changed? that's my question. >> passion is a reflection of conviction and belief. >> right. >> you get passionate because you really care about it. you can't keep faking it if you don't -- >> ronald reagan did not lose his temper often, but people knew where he stood. what's the difference? >> this is where -- >> with ronald reagan, h
, more theater rather than a lyndon johnson-like legislative agenda. he had 67 democratic senators to deal with. we're now dealing with an obama with 59. to put your whole domestic policy agenda into the laps of congress is proving to be a disaster. he's going to have to find bold things he can do with executive power. for example, taking bureau of land management, the wind farms or solar panels to deal with energy and federalize solar on already public lands. there are a lot of brazen and bold things you can do when you're president besides just putting over bills and asking for input for congress in hoping those 60 votes hang firm. i think you're going to see a more executive power barack obama after this health care situation gets solved. >> doug brinkley, presidential historian. thanks as always for coming on. >> thanks, david. >> you're welcome. >>> we want to take you back to capitol hill. if there was one major embarrassment to the last couple of months it was, of course, the white house party crashers, tareq and michaele salahi. there they are. in are being asked to testify
all the way to the signing of the voting rights act by lyndon johnson. and in between what we are told both has students and a nation in terms of popular imagination is there is all kind of sit-ins' and marches and demonstrations that occurred. but they are done by these famous iconic people. basically it's rosa parks who was so tired she refused to get up from the bus in montgomery alabama and sparked the boycott and basically a young preacher who even though the president referred to during the election as a young preacher from georgia which is dr. martin luther king, jr. who leads the masses of african-americans from racial oppression so this notion that rosa sat and martin could do this stuff and jesse could run and then barack obama could fly are all these things that sound good but they really simplify and much more complicated history and the complicated history involves so many african-americans, women and men who proactively dismantle racial segregation including rosa parks. rosa parks was an activist. she didn't just refuse to give up her seat by accident. it was a concerted
what they want congress to do. the gold standard has been lyndon johnson. on congressional votes in which lbj made his preference for the outcome clear. congress did what he wanted 93% of the time. that was in 1965. this past year, barack obama has topped that, he's broken the record, in 2009 on votes where president obama took a clear position, congress voted his way 96.7% of the time. that's a record. congressional quarterly sums up their findings by saying "barack obama's success rate was the highest not only for the first year of any presidency but for any year since congressional quarterly began the study 56 years ago." now, this president notably has picked his battles, he has deferred action on promises like repealing don't ask don't tell and closing guantanamo. the fate of afghanistan and iraq, the american role in those places, those are open questions. fighting terrorism is a treadmill that no one expects anyone to have the luxury of getting off any time soon. but as we close in on year one of the obama presidency. having prevented the second great depression with the p
in 1936. lyndon johnson in 1964. it ended when he got too involved in vietnam. ronald reagan in 1981, it ended when he suffered reversals in the 1982 election. and now barack obama. and that period of one year in which obama could essentially pass anything he wanted ended on tuesday. and it was unique period in american history. it's only been basically one of five periods since 1900 where a president had that kind of power. now, i think that he is more like a traditional president. he is going to have to horse trade and negotiate. he set up an environment and atmosphere where he can't. he is so antagonized and so polarized this country and so irredeemably alienated the republicans and the moderates and independents that i don't think anybody will talk to him at much less cut deals with him. >> bill: he didn't do it. whoa whoa whoa, wait a minute. he didn't do it because he hasn't been out there throwing the bombs. he let others do it, pelosi, reid, the disgraceful pundits who prop up the obama administration every night in the newspapers and on television. but he, himself, still sco
't really been used to describe african-americans since about the lyndon johnson administration. so what is that word doing on u.s. government forms now? u.s. government forms now, that every american is going to see this year? how the census bureau went all mayberry rfd. it's coming up. but more people prefer this sauce. winner of the blind taste test. the sweet and savory taste of prego. it's in there. new anti-aging eye roller. reduces puffiness immediately -- and also helps with lines and wrinkles. not surgery. this is our way to do your eyes. new regenerist anti-aging eye roller. >>> still ahead, the census and the "n" word, not that "n," word, but still an eye-opener. that's coming up. >>> but first, a couple of holy mackerel stories in today's news. a big controversy tonight over the nomination to the commerce department. that's right. something going on at the always-exciting commerce department has at least one social conservative group in a real tizzy. president obama nominated amanda simpson to serve in the commerce department. she got this job monitoring the export of u.s. we
, walter washington kes the oath ashe chief executive of t capital city. smh: lyndon johnson, whate did for d.c. congress wasn't read wasto go along.ry. so he essentlly created an iginary city council anmayor until he could get what hwanted. rrator: lbj's appointment of walter washington gave the city a megrown figurehead, that some eculate proved washingtians were capable of ting care of their own cy. povichthat was the whole thing abt the hill, "oh, those people n't govern themselves." well, i thk that walter proved them wrong. dr jarvis: walter washingn really understood the pow structure in the district columbia. how to solicit support om members of the hill and from some of t business leaders in t city who essentially re stand-ins for our elted government. barry: looking bk in retrospect, walter washiton, he made a pretty gd foundation. probably the oy one that could have gottethrough the senate. somedy like myself never wod have gotten confirmed. no, we're too hot, y know. narrator: despite lbs good intentions d walter washington's effort the ambiguous nature of the office dn't s
, since lyndon johnson. at this point, it's unlikely that democrats are going to be able to find a competitive candidate. they're still searching, the sittisit sitting congressman there, earl pa palm roy was probably the most likely. if it's tuesday, someone is voting somewhere. we vote every tuesday in this country. today's special election is in my home city, home county, miami-dade county, and it is a classic story. the county commissioner this, michelle spence jones, was suspended for corruption charges for allegedly siphoning $50,000 of public money to give to a family business. well, now she's running in the special election to replace herself and the governor, charlie crist, who already kicked her out of office once to create the special election has said he'll kick her out again if she wins this special. the irony is, this is like run of the mill miami corruption stuff. 50 grand? some day, i swear, miami county won't be known simply for its corrupt public officials, but that day is not coming very soon. >> oh, chuck, don't you miss florida? >> i do. >> thanks for that. >>
now what? >> joining us now, richard holbrooke. he's served every democratic president since lyndon johnson, the lead u.s. official in negotiating the dayton peace agreement that ended the war in bosnia. he joins us in advance of a major international summit in london. i think you leave tomorrow. is anything going to come out of this london summit, or is this all for show? >> this is more than show, but ten months ago, we met in the hague, right after president obama was inaugurated. hillary clinton led the delegation. we rallied the world behind the administration's new strategy. since then, karzai has been re-elected, a messy election, but it's done. president obama's announced the 30,000 troops you just referred to. and it's a very good time to bring the world back together to reaffirm its support and to move to the next stage, because we're now -- 2010 is going to be a year of heavy implementation. >> is about getting money from these -- >> no, this is not a pledging conference. enough of those for the time being. countries are coming through, the japanese have just quadrupled t
cities. with lyndon johnson i said, well, he understood national power better than almost anyone. so if i can can take his life, i can show how national power works. >> and you say you won for the third in your series, you us won the national book award. what's the effect of that? >> well, the effect on it, the effect on me was terrific. i was happy to win it. [laughter] >> did it change book sales? did it anything like that? >> it -- i'm not sure i know, i remember the answer to that question, to be honest with you. it did very, you know, that book did well. i can't remember if this had an impact on that, i'm sorry. >> author robert caro. .. >> host: welcome, jane goodall. just list the things they have accomplished which would probably take most of the interview, so we will move through an abbreviated version of that, founder of the jane goodall institute, author of groundbreaking studies of the chimpanzees that you observe. the author of several books, including "hope for animals and their world," which we're here to talk about today. and we might as well get to it, this book
the time from the brown desegregation court decision all the way to the voting rights act by lyndon johnson. in between what we are told the students and the nation is that there is all kinds of sedans and marches arches and demonstratiot occurred, but there are really done by the iconic people. basically rosa parks who just was so tired that she refused to give up from the bus in montgomery, alabama. basically a young preacher who even the president referred to during the election, this young preacher from georgia, which is dr. martin luther king jr., who sort of leads the masses of african-americans from racial oppression. this notion that rosa could sit and martin could do this stuff and barack could fly. all these things sound good, but really simplify a much more complicated history. that complicated history really involves so many african-americans, women and men who proactively dismantled racial segregation, including rosa parks. rosa parks was an activist. she did not just refuse to give up her seat by accident. it was a concerted, strategic effort to try to transform democratic ins
what happened in the gulf? it turned out to be a mass of lies. but they merely voted to give lyndon johnson the authority to launch what then became a very long war in vietnam. there's no democracy in the matters of foreign policy. and no checks and balances, no hope that congress will stop and say hey, let's look into this. let's see if this is true. know, and no hope for the supreme court deciding that a war is unconstitutional. and we have not fought the constitutional war since the end of world war two. constitution requires that congress declare war, connors has not declared war. in any war that we have fought. to have been many world war ii. you learn in school if something is unconstitutional, it's the job of the supreme court to say so and do something about it. know. after all, who are the supreme court? just because they wear black robes doesn't give them any special moral standing. they are apolitical appointees, and they do the bidding of the people who appointed them. so if they don't have democracy in the upper reaches of government, and we can't depend on checks and b
need lyndon johnson behind the scenes. if you have ronald reagan and bill clinton also trying to explain to the american people in states like virginia, and massachusetts, and new jersey, and what specifically it means to them, it's hard to get things done. >> it's difficult, the mandate the president had. think what he could do, so many things moving forward, that he stayed back as much as he did, and as every democrat i talked to off the record says to me, anthony is one of the few that says it on the record. come on, get involved. he doesn't get involved. >> he has been rolled by the congress of the united states in this awful system. he got rolled to some extent on the stimulus package. >> hold on a second, krarlcarl. to get rolled, you have to say this is what i want. the president hasn't said -- >> on health care, he did not say what he wanted. he was unwilling to fight for a specific package. >> and that was his top agenda item. >> and he made a big mistake. and i think the white house knows it. one thing we haven't said and that was that he and white house expected ted
of legislation in a bipartisan way? guest: we just had president kennedy dining in 1963, lyndon johnson coming on. after that state of the union address, they talked about civil rights legislation. back then, it was a totally different time. the south was controlled by conservative democrats who were against civil rights. lyndon johnson had to reach out to republicans and was successful. at that time, you may also recall we had a 75-day filibuster in the u.s. senate against the civil rights act, that was finally broken in june. that is one of the most significant examples where the president has reached out to another party. host: manassas, virginia. independent line. caller: my question is regarding the agenda. there are about 580 congress people and senators. i want to -- i watched them sit up and get down applauding. i also know they have staffers. it seems like they guide policy. they are told what the senators think, and then they come back and say what they should stay. is it more than that? just gguest: as a former staffer myself, members of congress could not function if they did not have
to be down with lyndon johnson. it's just not going to be remembered in that sense unless his presidency turns from this point--. >> lehrer: that's what started-- >> that's right. >> lehrer: all right. david, mark, thank you both very much. and our state of the union coverage tons line. hari sreenivasan previews what's there. >> now we want your reaction to the president's speech. you can post a video response on our youtube channel or post comments on our blog and we will feature a few on our broadcast. some of the our experts are annotating the full text of the speech with context, commentary, and background. you'll find that on line as well later this evening we'll post interviews of lawmakers from capitol hill. that you will and more is at our web site, newshour.pbs.org. >> lehrer: that ends our special edition of the newshour. we'll have analysis and reaction to the president's speech right here tomorrow evening on the newshour. for now, i'm jim lehrer. thank you, and good night. captioning sponsor [dramatic violin music] ♪ [people talking simultaneously] ♪ [birds twittering] [g
, who's worked on rigs since lyndon johnson was president, described for us some of the myriad subcontractors used to prep this drill pad. >> it requires a lot of service is companies to perform the operations that we do out here, you know, we have service companies, water line companies, vacuum truck companies, companies to run gyro for directions, many services that we use that you don't see out here right now. >> now, no bona fide american gold rush is without its costs. local environmental activist pat took travis of dead and dying trees seemingly contaminated in wayne county, pennsylvania, and even chief oil and gas the had to pay the susquehanna river basin a $200,000 find because it exceeded the amount of water it was allowed to take. the company told us that was a misunderstanding and an incident, by the way, that caused no environmental damage. now, if you've been living in this area, you've been knowing about this incredible gold rush for some time. i want to the share with you, jane, some of the headlines lately that have appeared in the scranton times tribune, one o
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